Finding a Rhyme and a Reason

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What happens when you betray a friends trust?

September26
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Literary connection: In her picture book The Very Best of Friends (1989), Margaret Wild suggest friendships can be fragile. Wild supports this suggestion when her character Jesse, a widow, and her late husband’s cat, William find themselves alone and trying to cope with James’ unexpected death. Wild’s purpose is to show that people and animals, in order to cope with loss, have to find a way to move on with life and living instead of abusing each other. In a tone that is at times whimsical and other times serious, Wild appeals to readers young and old who value friends and family.

by posted under Literary Connections | 7 Comments »    
7 Comments to

“What happens when you betray a friends trust?”

  1. September 26th, 2012 at 3:46 PM      Reply amiracle henry Says:

    When you violate somebody they will be mad at you and that person will not trust you any more. You and the person you betrayed may get into a fight or arguement. That’s why it’s important to have trust in a class room because people might tell private things that they may only want you and the person they tell to know about because its personal.


  2. September 26th, 2012 at 4:36 PM      Reply Corianna Hill Says:

    When you betray someones trust it makes that person not want to be around you. That person will not believe anything you say. Betraying someone’s trust gives them a reason to not tell you anything. Trust is important in a class because the students in the class have to trust you to work with you. Teacher also have to trust you because if they dont trust you, they proably wouldn’t want to be around you, or they wouldn’t want you in their class.


  3. September 26th, 2012 at 5:32 PM      Reply beingmii99 Says:

    When you betray someone’s trust, they begin to not trust you and keep an annoying close watch on you.


    • September 27th, 2012 at 6:26 PM      Reply Ms. Hayes Says:

      I concur that this is what could happen. However, I’m wondering how you might state this so that it does not appear awkward and redundant. I am also sure that your fellow bloggers would be delighted if you elaborated. Perhaps you could make some connections to one of our books to provide evidence in support of your arguement.


  4. September 27th, 2012 at 9:39 AM      Reply prettytwiggy123 Says:

    When you betray a friend’s trust, you are not a loyal or true friend.


  5. September 28th, 2012 at 10:08 PM      Reply Bo$$l3AH#1 Says:

    when you betray your friends trust its basiclly like your not going to tell them anything like secrets and etc…. and they mainly happen when you tell your friend a secret and tell them not to tell anyone but they do tell and the secret gets out to everyone then your mad and firious because it was something that was supose to stay with just you and your friend.


  6. October 4th, 2012 at 12:29 PM      Reply caelyn Says:

    When you betray someone’s trust they don’t want to talk to you at all, they tell people that they don’t like you, and that person is going to want to fight you just because you told their secret. They may be so mad that they lie about you and talk about you behind your back to your friends. Then your friends start talking about you and then your feelings are hurt really bad. Then you will think that it is bad that you told somebody’s else business which made them tell your business. Also, trust is very important in a classroom because everybody tells things that no one should know, and they should not go back and tell anyone or a adult.


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